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Leaf through a library on your next trip

Kraufmann/Susanne Kern / Landeshauptstadt Stuttgart

The new central library in Stuttgart, Germany, has joined the Mercedes-Benz Museum as a major local attraction.

E-readers such as Kindle or Nook may be hot holiday gifts this season, but that doesn't mean libraries are a thing of the past. In fact, with architecturally significant buildings, exhibitions and a wide range of amenities, the public libraries in many cities rank alongside museums and other cultural attractions as must-see destinations for many travelers.

Here are five libraries worth a visit:

Landeshauptstadt Stuttgart

The new central library in Stuttgart, Germany, has an all-white floor plan.

Stuttgart Central Library, Stuttgart, Germany
Officially dedicated at the end of November, the new central library in Stuttgart, Germany, has joined the Mercedes-Benz Museum as a major local attraction. Designed by Korean architect Eun Young Yi, the Stadtbibliothek is a nine-story, cubed, glass block structure that looks staid and grey during the day but glows iridescent blue at night. Inside, an open, all-white floor plan pushes the books to the perimeter, surrounding the children’s library and the multi-zoned reading, research and gathering spaces.

Don’t miss: To emphasize that this new facility is open to all, the word "Library" is written in English on the outer wall of one side of the building and written in German, Korean and Arabic on the other three.

Seattle Public Library

The Seattle Central Library, which opened in 2004, has become one of the city's most visited attractions.

Central Library, Seattle, Washington
When it opened in 2004, the New York Times’ Herbert Muschamp described the downtown Central Library in Seattle, Wash., as “a blazing chandelier to swing your dreams upon.”

Designed by Pritzker Prize-winning architect Rem Koolhaas, the unusually-shaped steel and glass building with 30 miles of books arranged in an ingenious ‘Books Spiral’ has become one of the city’s most visited attractions. “More than 2 million people visit the Central Library year,” said Seattle Public Library spokesperson Andra Allison. “You can’t go anywhere in the building without seeing tourists with cameras.”

Don’t miss: Take a guided or self-guided tour, but don’t miss the view from the 10th floor.

Courtesy British Library

With more than 150 million items, London's British Library is one of the world's largest.

British Library, London
With more than 150 million items, London’s British Library is one of the world's largest and most comprehensive. In addition to public tours and events, the library displays world treasures from a collection that includes the 1215 Magna Carta, Leonardo da Vinci’s notes on architecture and arithmetic, illuminated manuscripts and Shakespeare’s First Folio.

Don’t miss: Current exhibitions explore the role of supernatural phenomena in the work of Charles Dickens and Arthur Conan Doyle’s ‘lost’ novel.

Nicolai Perjesi / Courtesy Wonderful Copenhagen

Denmark's Royal Library holds printed Danish works dating back to 1482.

Royal Library, Copenhagen, Denmark
Founded in 1648, Denmark’s Royal Library holds printed Danish works dating back to 1482. The original 1906 library building on Copenhagen’s harbor was expanded in 1999 with an angular, shiny black granite addition now referred to as the Black Diamond. Today, the library is one of the city’s most popular tourist attractions and is home to the National Museum of Photography, a 600-seat concert hall with its own 10-member ensemble, a garden, a roof-top terrace and several exhibition spaces.

Don’t miss: Public tours of the old and new library buildings are offered each Saturday afternoon at 3 p.m.

Benoit Doppagne / AFP/Getty Images

The Trinity College Library's Long Room contains oak bookcases filled with 200,000 of the library's oldest books.

Trinity College Library, Dublin, Ireland
Dublin’s Trinity College Library is Ireland’s largest. It’s also one of the country’s biggest tourist attractions, mostly because the library is home to the Book of Kells, a lavishly decorated, four-volume illuminated manuscript created by Celtic monks in the 9th century. Two volumes are displayed to the public at a time: one is open to a significant, decorated page; another shows two pages of script.

Don’t miss: In addition to the Book of Kells and other related manuscripts, visitors may tour the library’s Long Room, which contains oak bookcases filled with 200,000 of the library’s oldest books, a collection of marble busts depicting writers, philosophers and men connected with the college and Ireland’s oldest harp, which dates to the 15th century.

Which special libraries have you visited in your travels? Tell us in the comments section below.

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